Start Seventeen dating fourteen year old girl

Seventeen dating fourteen year old girl

Many of the events before 6,000 years ago in Westeros, during the Age of Heroes, are half-legendary, and some of the more fanciful tales of these times probably have little basis in reality.

The recorded history of Westeros extends back over 12,000 years, according to tradition, though the accuracy of the legends and myths that recount much of this history is openly questioned by the maesters of the Citadel, amongst others. In the fantasy world in which Westeros is set, civilization just gradually coalesced from the hunter-gatherer level, as in real-life.

As with real-life medieval cultures, the people who inhabit the known world in which the continents of Westeros, Essos, and Sothoryos are located do not possess objective knowledge about how their world was created. Many different cultures have their own theories about how the world began and how the human race came to be, usually tied to which religion they practice.

All history books display the biases of their authors to some degree.

The oldest written histories in Westeros were made by the Andal invaders, and they depicted themselves in a positive light as they killed or conquered the First Men of the south.

The difference is purely one of nomenclature: "the year 298 AL" and "the year 298 AC" are exactly the same.

The known world that Westeros and Essos are set in has variable seasons that can last for years, sometimes a decade each (though such long seasons only come once every century or two).

Months are the same as in real-life, roughly a thirty day period. Apparently Westeros doesn't actually have specific names for each month/moon-turn - given that even after five novels a month name has never been mentioned, and the actual month names stem from real-life history (i.e., July and August were named after Roman Emperors).

When the in-universe history text from the novellas about the Dance of the Dragons give specific dates, they are usually just in the format "on the fifth day of the third moon of the year 131 AL" etc.

Even more simple "cultural traditions" and oral histories have much to say on the subject but no hard evidence.

Some of these oral traditions are known to be simply inaccurate: the Dothraki believe that the first man came into being one thousand years ago, when even the written histories of other continuous civilizations stretch back five to six thousand years.

A few other hour names have been mentioned in passing: The timeline of the books is broadly similar to that of the TV series, with several minor differences.